Wednesday, June 28, 2006

As for me / Slack Blogger / Off Topic

As for me...
I'm doing well. Not so many seizures. About the same as the previous few weeks: 0-2 a day. Last week was a little higher than this week so far. Probably due to the trip I took. Trips add stress - which is never good for seizures.

Slack Blogger...
Yes I know. No posts in 6 days. Pretty shamefull. I'll try to post a few things this week.

Off Topic...
The United States Senate spent a whole week debating whether to amend the Constitution to prevent flag burning (this is a huge problem here in the U.S. - there have been 34 flag burnings in the last 16 years)... it did not pass, but what a waste of time and tax dollars. It would have been much better to spend a week debating universal health care. There are 40 million people with no health care in this country. That works out to at least 400,000 people with epilepsy. I plan to write my Senators (Burr & Dole) and request that they quit wasting my tax dollars on political drivel and get back to working on real problems that the people of this nation face.

BTW: It is easy to contact your Senators - Click Here to find your Senator and the page from which to email them.

2 comments:

Michael S. Class said...

The first federal Flag Protection Act was passed by Congress in 1968 in response to protest burnings of the flag at demonstrations against the Vietnam War. Over time, 48 of the 50 U.S. states also enacted similar flag protection laws as well. All of these statutes were overturned by the Supreme Court of the United States by a 5-4 vote in the case Texas v. Johnson, (1989) as unconstitutional restrictions of public expression.

After the Johnson decision, Congress quickly passed a new Flag Protection Act, which was also struck down by the Supreme Court the following year by the same 5-4 majority in the case U.S. v. Eichman (1990). The Court decided that expression through flag burning was constitutionally protected.

BUT...

Ruling in an important First Amendment case, Virginia v. Black, (2003) the U.S. Supreme Court said that states may outlaw acts of cross burning.

Emeriol said...

Thanks for the concise history on the cases & history of flag-burning. I think that is very important for people to be aware of the history behind any event.

One can see in this instance that although the majority of Americans do not want to see their national flag being burnt, that they are wrong to try to prohibit it. Our founding fathers wisely put in place 10 amendments known as the Bill of Rights, which aren’t always popular, but are fundamental to protecting a free society. The Supreme Court made the correct ruling in both cases.

Probably the most practical reason to permit people to burn the American flag is to allow them to express their rage at the actions of the federal government without causing physical harm to individuals or property.

One might argue that if the cross can be protected from burning, why shouldn’t the flag? Unlike the burning of the flag, which is intended to protest the policies of the government, crosses are burnt, not as a protest, but as part of a terror attack on individuals. Having been a recipient of a cross-burning on my family’s front yard, I can personally attest to the fear it causes. Cross-burning is not an expression of free speech, but a tool of the Ku Klux Klan, America’s “home-grown” terrorist organization.

…. I … I wish now that I had not responded to this post… this attack against my family occurred 25 years ago. Renewing the memories has brought a realization that the men with their guns, white hoods, and fiery cross, who terrorized my family and myself, will never be brought to justice. The Ku Klux Klan, whose only difference from Al Qaeda is the color of their hoods, has been given amnesty by our national government. This terrorist group has an open presence in our country, and yet the United States government does nothing to prosecute them. In all seriousness… I may get a flag and ignite it in protest… then send the ashes to my senators … the same ones that could have spent the last week debating ways to prosecute terrorist groups openly operating in the United States…